Stop Sexualizing Women!

She makes some wonderful points but one that we need to stop buying into this! Stop buying Cosmo, Glamour, and Vogue. The modeling, porn, and acting industries are responsible but so are the women who agree to take on these dehumanizing roles. Teach your daughters, sisters, and girl friends who are interested in getting into the “Hollywood” industry or the like, to only take on roles that show them as a full human beings. Not only do we have to complain to the companies who are sexualizing women, but also to women like Kim Kardashian who help the media continue to portray women in a dehumanizing way by acting like bimbos.

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A Writer After My Own Heart

Sarah Romero

The latter half of 2011 has been my Breakfast at Tiffany’s period.  It started when I attempted to use the Audrey Hepburn film, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, as a way to lull my three-year old son to sleep one night.  It failed to put him to sleep, but it did spark what I hope will be a long, shared love of classic films between me and my son.  The next night, he specifically asked to watch “the movie with the lady eating a doughnut in front of the window… the one with ‘Cat.'”

On a trip to the Rancho Mirage Public Library shortly after our movie night, I was compelled to check out Breakfast at Tiffany’s: A short novel and three stories by Truman Capote (New York: Random House, Inc., 1958).  As much as I loved the film version for its romanticism, I loved the original form of the story…

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The 35 Writers Who Run the Literary Internet

Flavorwire

The debate as to whether the Internet is good or bad for literature doesn’t seem any closer to resolution now than when it began, years ago, but the fact remains that some people in the literary world are excellent at using Twitter, Tumblr, Facebook, and even Instagram or Pinterest to communicate with readers and get people interested in what they’re writing. These aren’t the writers who have hundreds of thousands of Twitter followers but only tweet when they have a book come out, or the ones who write a guest blog post every year to get their names back into the conversation.

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Holly hits 50: how Breakfast At Tiffany’s came to the screen and changed everything

George's Journal

Good golly, Miss Holly: Audrey Hepburn as the irrepressible, irresistible Holly Golightly in Breakfast At Tiffany’s – perhaps the signature role of her delightful, unforgettable career

Blogs are supposed to be sources of personal opinions, assertions and divulgences, so perhaps it’s time I offer you up a confession, folks. And here it is. I was 19 years-old and in my first year of university: fashionably, I had a poster on my wall of Jennifer Aniston; unfashionably, I fell hopelessly in love with Audrey Hepburn. And the latter had absolutely everything to do with my very first viewing of Breakfast At Tiffany’s (1961).

Like it had for so many peeps before and has for many more since, that movie and the angelic Audrey in the titular role of Holly Golightly utterly bewitched me. I must have watched my recorded-from-the-TV VHS version of the film God knows how many times over the next year…

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